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The Premier of “From I through We to Community”

The premier of the documentary “From I through We to Community” which is produced by Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization took place on Thursday, 28 April 2016. From I through We to Community documents the journey of 24 young Afghan women and men in order to address ethnic conflict in Afghanistan at the grassroots level. More than 450 people watched the documentary inside the Arghawan Hall of the historical Babur’s Garden in Kabul. Before the premier of the documentary, the harmonious melody of instruments played by a group of students from the Afghanistan National Institute of Music (ANIM) rejuvenated the spirit of unity and resonated the music of diversity. Hamid who watched the documentary from the end of the hall with keen eyes said: “The documentary creates many questions in the beginning. Those question captivate you with curiosity throughout the documentary.  At the end, you see the transformation with a strong message. It has the potential to prompt people to re-evaluate their relations with other ethnic groups and question their formerly held perceptions.” 24 project participants were also present at the event. They shared their experiences, observations and stories from their visit to the provinces, hospitality and encounters with...

Infinite Incompleteness: A Documentary Theater Play

Infinite Incompleteness tells the stories of ten Afghan women and men who have lost members of their families as a result of the various conflicts in Afghanistan over the past three decades. The stories are told verbatim by three anonymous afghan men dressed in national colures. Each of the three men represents one of three largest groups in the country: Pashtun, Tajik, and Hazara (the fourth main ethnic groups, uzbek, is also represented in tow of the stories).the stories are told in their respective languages Pashto, Dari and Hazaragi. While the three men tell the stories of the suffering of their people, the engage in three recurring, tiresome and ultimately traumatizing activities: digging up the dead, rebuilding the country and, metaphorically, carrying the load of war and loss. In the background, a pregnant Afghan woman, the Butimar-e Kabul, whose two  children have  disappeared during one of the conflict periods, hauntingly counts the millions of dead, burning their pictures in an Afghan Bkhori (Stove). Read more

Memory Box 2015-16: A Continued Struggle to Break the Cycle of Tragedy in Afghanistan

AHRDO conducted two Memory Box workshops in 2015 with the victims of the ongoing conflict in Afghanistan. Each workshop was followed by an inter-workshop participants Memory Box exhibition. In the first Memory Box workshop, participants came from the members of the victims of Afghan conflict in the last one and a half decade. In the second Memory Box workshop, the participants came from the family members of victims who had lost their lives in catastrophic bomb blasts and suicide attacks in Kabul in 2015. Most of the victims in those incidents were ordinary daily-wage workers, school/university students and other civilians. Using the Aesthetics of the Oppressed, AHRDO trainer, Salim Rajabi, worked with the victims to help them revitalize their creativity, retell their stories of loss and memories of their loved ones, imagine their ideal Afghanistan and draw favorite flags for Afghanistan they wish to see.  Inter-workshop participants exhibitions were aimed to connect the victims’ survivors to each other and the public exhibition was held to share their memories and stories with the wider public, media and human rights organizations and activists. The day of the second inter-workshop participants exhibition was planned to coincide with December 10th, International Human Rights Day...

Women in the Eyes of Men: Tackling the Structural Roots of Women’s Problems

On the Occasion of 8th March, AHRDO Republishes Key Recommendations of its Recent Report on Women Rights. Executive Summery and Recommendations Despite the progress made on women’s rights in the last decade, the situation of women in Afghanistan remains dire. There is a need for significant change in the attitudes and behaviors of Afghan men towards women. Characterized by parochialism, suspicion, violence and control, Afghan men largely view women as subordinates and often treat them either with denigration or negligence. The entrenched attitudes and behaviors of Afghan men are central to understanding the slow pace of Afghan women’s development. In order for women to continue their progress in social, economic, political and private spheres, attitudinal changes in Afghan men are essential to creating a favorable institutional and social environment for this to occur. Afghan men dominate key institutions and social structures that not only influence, but also shape and configure, women’s life in public and private realms. Patriarchal family structures, a masculine religious establishment, unsafe public space, the male dominated market place and conservative culture and traditions considerably restrain women both privately and publicly. Women face complex structural forces that tacitly and expressly affect their lives and negatively impact their...